Now Playing

Today - Wednesday May 25, 2016

7:00pm

Deadpool

2016, USA, 108 MINS, 18A

Dir: Tim Miller
Starring: Ryan Reynolds, Morena Baccarin, T.J. Miller

Wade Wilson (Ryan Reynolds) is a former Special Forces operative who now works as a mercenary. His world comes crashing down when evil scientist Ajax (Ed Skrein) tortures, disfigures and transforms him into Deadpool. The rogue experiment leaves Deadpool with accelerated healing powers and a twisted sense of humor. With help from mutant allies Colossus and Negasonic Teenage Warhead (Brianna Hildebrand), Deadpool uses his new skills to hunt down the man who nearly destroyed his life.

9:15pm

Eye in the Sky

2016, UK, 102 MINS, 14A

Dir: Gavin Hood
Starring: Alan Rickman, Helen Mirren, Aaron Paul

A fascinating look at how our leaders wage war now, Eye in the Sky takes us into the control rooms and shipping containers where military personnel make decisions that could result in the deaths of people thousands of miles away. Featuring Helen Mirren, Aaron Paul, and Alan Rickman, the latest from Tsotsi director Gavin Hood is enormously pertinent and eerily entertaining.

The goal of British-led Operation Cobra is the capture of Aisha Al Hady (Lex King), a radicalized British citizen who has joined the Somali terrorist group Al Shabab. But their "capture" objective is changed to "kill" when the indomitable Colonel Katherine Powell (Mirren), who has been tracking Al Hady for years, learns that Al Shabab is planning suicide attacks. Nevada-based drone operator Steve Watts (Paul) targets Al Shabab's Nairobi safehouse but reports back to London that a nine-year-old girl has entered the kill zone. Given the value of the target, could a civilian child be chalked up to collateral damage? Is the potential political fallout worth the risk?

Written by Guy Hibbert with an unerring ear for military doublespeak, Eye in the Sky becomes blackly comic as the officers' concern with optics sparks a protracted game of bureaucratic pass-the-buck, with everyone "referring up" the chain of command, through the UK Foreign Secretary (who has food poisoning) and the US Foreign Secretary (busy attending a ping pong tournament in China) all the way up to the Prime Minister. Shades of Dr. Strangelove abound — though, as with the Kubrick classic, Eye in the Sky is only as funny as it is because the truths it arrives at are so very grave and resonant. - TIFF




Thursday May 26, 2016

7:00pm

Tap Takeover - Shaun Of The Dead feat. Abe Erb Brewing Company

2004, UK/France, 99 MINS, 14A

Dir: Edgar Wright
Starring: Nick Frost, Simon Pegg, Bill Nighy

Join us May 26th for another Tap Takeover event! This time featuring taps and bottles from our soon to be neighbours the Abe Erb Brewing Company , and a screening of Shaun of the Dead!

We'll be offering a wide selection of Abe Erb beer during the evening and the folks from Abe Erb will be on hand to chat about their beer, the process, hops, barley, etc. So come enjoy a drink and chat with the brewers about all things beer while a zombie apocalypse rages outside.

One drink included in the ticket price!* Get your tickets HERE

Doors at 5pm so swing by early, get cozy, and enjoy some pre feature shorts.

Movie starts at 7:00pm





9:30pm

Deadpool

2016, USA, 108 MINS, 18A

Dir: Tim Miller
Starring: Ryan Reynolds, Morena Baccarin, T.J. Miller

Wade Wilson (Ryan Reynolds) is a former Special Forces operative who now works as a mercenary. His world comes crashing down when evil scientist Ajax (Ed Skrein) tortures, disfigures and transforms him into Deadpool. The rogue experiment leaves Deadpool with accelerated healing powers and a twisted sense of humor. With help from mutant allies Colossus and Negasonic Teenage Warhead (Brianna Hildebrand), Deadpool uses his new skills to hunt down the man who nearly destroyed his life.

Friday May 27, 2016

6:45pm

Labyrinth

1986, 101 MINS, PG

Dir: Jim Henson
Starring: David Bowie, Jennifer Connelly, Toby Froud

Journey into the fantastical world of Labyrinth, starring David Bowie and a cast of incredible creatures created by Jim Henson and produced by the Master of Myth, George Lucas! Frustrated with babysitting on yet another weekend night, Sarah, a teenager with an active imagination, summons the Goblins from her favorite book, Labyrinth, to take her baby stepbrother away. When little Toby actually disappears, Sarah must follow him into the world of the fairy tale to rescue him from the wicked Goblin King (Bowie)! Guarding his castle is The Labyrinth itself, a twisted maze of deception, populated with outrageous characters and unknown dangers. To get through it in time to save Toby, Sarah will have to outwit the King by befriending the very Goblins who protect him, in hopes that their loyalty isn't just another illusion in a place where nothing is as it seems! "I couldn't wish for a movie with more imagination or fun!" says critic Leonard Maltin.

9:30pm

Purple Rain

1984, 110 MINS, 14A

Dir: Albert Magnoli
Starring: Prince, Apollonia Kotero, Morris Day

"...this is the rare pop movie that works the way a great rock & roll song does: It tells a simple, almost elemental tale and uses the music to set it aflame." - Owen Gleiberman, Entertainment Weekly

Purple Rain is the semi-autobiographical tale of The Kid, a Minneapolis musician navigating the club scene while dealing with a romantic rival and a difficult family life. A massive hit upon release, it's a showcase for Prince's otherworldly musical, visual and sartorial stylings, and introduced the world to the glory of "When Doves Cry," "Let's Go Crazy," and of course, "Purple Rain." 



Saturday May 28, 2016

1:00pm

Princess Bride

1987, USA, 98 MINS, PG

Dir: Rob Reiner
Starring: Cary Elwes, Andre The Giant, Robin Wright, Mandy Patinkin, Wallace Shawn

Based on William Goldman's novel of the same name, The Princess Bride is staged as a book read by grandfather (Peter Falk) to his ill grandson (Fred Savage). Falk's character assures a romance-weary Savage that the book has much more to deliver than a simpering love story, including but not limited to fencing, fighting, torture, death, true love, giants, and pirates. Indeed, The Princess Bride offers a tongue-in-cheek fairy tale depicting stable boy-turned-pirate Westley's journey to rescue Buttercup (Robin Wright), his true love, away from the evil prince (Chris Sarandon), whom she had agreed to marry five years after learning of what she had believed to be news of Westley's death. With help from Prince Humperdinck's disgruntled former employee Miracle Max (Billy Crystal), swordsman Inigo Montoya (Mandy Patinkin), and a very large man named Fezzik (Andre the Giant), the star-crossed lovers are reunited. ~ Tracie Cooper, Rovi




3:15pm

Close Encounters Of The Third Kind

1977, USA, 137 MINS, PG

Dir: Steven Spielberg
Starring: Richard Dreyfuss, François Truffaut, Teri Garr

Steven Spielberg might have made bigger and better movies, but the one that encompasses everything the filmmaker is about is Close Encounters Of The Third Kind.

It has a beautiful sense of wonderment and imagination, yet is as thematically dark as anything Spielberg has ever done (yes, that includes Schindler's List and Poltergeist). On the one hand it's about a man trying to discover the unknown mysteries of the universe to find a connection with another race. On the other, it's about a man isolated from society by irrational obsession he himself does not understand.

It's magical, sad, awe-inspiring and unsettling all at once. It is an emotionall complex experience.

After an encounter with a UFO, Roy Neary's mind is laden with visions and alien music. As more strange events occur in the area, it seems something big is about to happen.

Neary is one of many people in the area who begin to be obsessed with a certain location in the desert and to his friends, family, and neighbors, seems to be quickly losing his mind. As his obsession costs him his job and contact with his loved ones, he meets others with similar experiences, and together, they are determined to find out the truth about human and alien contact. - courtesy of Alamo Drafthouse



6:45pm

Ghost In The Shell

1995, Japan, 83 MINS, 14A

Dir: Mamoru Oshii
Starring: Atsuko Tanaka, Iemasa Kayumi, Akio Ôtsuka

With its sprawling neon cityscapes, silly techno-sex and preponderance of flapping leather trenchcoats, the cyberpunk genre felt dated almost as soon as it arrived. But a few key artefacts have survived the ravages of time: the early novels of William Gibson, the first ‘Matrix’ movie and this dizzying, ideas-heavy 1995 animated action flick. 

In a rain-flecked dystopian city, hybrid human-machine souls, or ‘ghosts’, patrol both the physical world and the knotted networks of cyberspace. When a rogue hacker known only as the Puppet Master manages to infiltrate government firewalls, it’s up to relentless, frequently nude female cyborg Kusanagi to track him down. 

There are moments of sheer visual poetry in ‘Ghost in the Shell’: its crumbling metropolis is vaster and more detailed than anything this side of ‘Blade Runner’, and the interface between the real world and cyberspace is beautifully realised. The plot is impossibly dense and the characters – perhaps appropriately – feel like little more than cyphers, but for sheer mind-expanding sci-fi strangeness this is hard to beat. - Tom Huddleston, TimeOut




9:30pm

Akira

1988, Japan, 124 MINS, 14A

Dir: Katsuhiro Ôtomo
Starring: Nozomu Sasaki, Mami Koyama, Mitsuo Iwata

There are certain science-fiction films, such as Blade Runner and Kubrick's 2001, that are so well realised that they can influence the genre for decades to come. Now Akira has been around for some 27 years (and is due for a Hollywood remake), we have seen how long a shadow it has cast not only over science fiction but also animation, it sits comfortably alongside those other lauded titles. Another thing it shares with them is how it always offers up something new or missed with every viewing. The plot, straightforward to some, impenetrable to others, concerns a futuristic neo-Tokyo biker gang whose lives are impacted on after an accidental collision with a secret government-run project dealing with telekinetic powers in children. Style and substance run neck and neck in this thrilling, bold landmark film that just refuses to become dated. - TheGuardian

Sunday May 29, 2016

1:00pm

Labyrinth

1986, 101 MINS, PG

Dir: Jim Henson
Starring: David Bowie, Jennifer Connelly, Toby Froud

Journey into the fantastical world of Labyrinth, starring David Bowie and a cast of incredible creatures created by Jim Henson and produced by the Master of Myth, George Lucas! Frustrated with babysitting on yet another weekend night, Sarah, a teenager with an active imagination, summons the Goblins from her favorite book, Labyrinth, to take her baby stepbrother away. When little Toby actually disappears, Sarah must follow him into the world of the fairy tale to rescue him from the wicked Goblin King (Bowie)! Guarding his castle is The Labyrinth itself, a twisted maze of deception, populated with outrageous characters and unknown dangers. To get through it in time to save Toby, Sarah will have to outwit the King by befriending the very Goblins who protect him, in hopes that their loyalty isn't just another illusion in a place where nothing is as it seems! "I couldn't wish for a movie with more imagination or fun!" says critic Leonard Maltin.

3:15pm

Purple Rain

1984, 110 MINS, 14A

Dir: Albert Magnoli
Starring: Prince, Apollonia Kotero, Morris Day

"...this is the rare pop movie that works the way a great rock & roll song does: It tells a simple, almost elemental tale and uses the music to set it aflame." - Owen Gleiberman, Entertainment Weekly

Purple Rain is the semi-autobiographical tale of The Kid, a Minneapolis musician navigating the club scene while dealing with a romantic rival and a difficult family life. A massive hit upon release, it's a showcase for Prince's otherworldly musical, visual and sartorial stylings, and introduced the world to the glory of "When Doves Cry," "Let's Go Crazy," and of course, "Purple Rain." 



6:30pm

Close Encounters Of The Third Kind

1977, USA, 137 MINS, PG

Dir: Steven Spielberg
Starring: Richard Dreyfuss, François Truffaut, Teri Garr

Steven Spielberg might have made bigger and better movies, but the one that encompasses everything the filmmaker is about is Close Encounters Of The Third Kind.

It has a beautiful sense of wonderment and imagination, yet is as thematically dark as anything Spielberg has ever done (yes, that includes Schindler's List and Poltergeist). On the one hand it's about a man trying to discover the unknown mysteries of the universe to find a connection with another race. On the other, it's about a man isolated from society by irrational obsession he himself does not understand.

It's magical, sad, awe-inspiring and unsettling all at once. It is an emotionall complex experience.

After an encounter with a UFO, Roy Neary's mind is laden with visions and alien music. As more strange events occur in the area, it seems something big is about to happen.

Neary is one of many people in the area who begin to be obsessed with a certain location in the desert and to his friends, family, and neighbors, seems to be quickly losing his mind. As his obsession costs him his job and contact with his loved ones, he meets others with similar experiences, and together, they are determined to find out the truth about human and alien contact. - courtesy of Alamo Drafthouse



9:30pm

Starship Troopers

1997, USA, 129 MINS, 18A

Dir: Paul Verhoeven
Starring: Neil Patrick Harris, Michael Ironside, Casper Van Dien, Denise Richards, Dina Meyer, Jake Busey

High school graduates Johnny Rico, Dizzy, Carmen and Carl enlist in the armed forces of the Federation. Training takes its toll, and Johnny is on the point of throwing in the towel when space insects wipe out his home town Buenos Aires. The infantry are despatched to the outer limits of the galaxy to give 'em what for, but...you guessed it. An adaptation of a Robert A Heinlein novel, this replays World War II as sci-fi spectacular - and this time we're rooting for the fascists. Presumably director Verhoeven meant it as a sour, ironic joke. If so, he's kept an admirably straight face. His totalitarian utopia looks like a daytime soap: bright, clean, empty. And his lead players might be caricatures of Aryan perfection. It falls to Ironside's motivational teacher/commander, Rasczak, to whip them into shape ('If you don't do your job, I shoot you!'). It says a lot about the director that the movie only kicks into life when the carnage starts. The bugs make up in numbers what they lack in charm, the scale of the battle scenes takes the breath away, and the violence is unremittingly gruesome. On the surface, this is grotesque, reactionary trash, yet by the end, when Verhoeven turns a giant brain-sucking maggot into an object of pity, it's hard not to be impressed by the sheer perversity of the enterprise. -TimeOut




Monday May 30, 2016

7:00pm

Akira

1988, Japan, 124 MINS, 14A

Dir: Katsuhiro Ôtomo
Starring: Nozomu Sasaki, Mami Koyama, Mitsuo Iwata

There are certain science-fiction films, such as Blade Runner and Kubrick's 2001, that are so well realised that they can influence the genre for decades to come. Now Akira has been around for some 27 years (and is due for a Hollywood remake), we have seen how long a shadow it has cast not only over science fiction but also animation, it sits comfortably alongside those other lauded titles. Another thing it shares with them is how it always offers up something new or missed with every viewing. The plot, straightforward to some, impenetrable to others, concerns a futuristic neo-Tokyo biker gang whose lives are impacted on after an accidental collision with a secret government-run project dealing with telekinetic powers in children. Style and substance run neck and neck in this thrilling, bold landmark film that just refuses to become dated. - TheGuardian

9:00pm

Ghost In The Shell

1995, Japan, 83 MINS, 14A

Dir: Mamoru Oshii
Starring: Atsuko Tanaka, Iemasa Kayumi, Akio Ôtsuka

With its sprawling neon cityscapes, silly techno-sex and preponderance of flapping leather trenchcoats, the cyberpunk genre felt dated almost as soon as it arrived. But a few key artefacts have survived the ravages of time: the early novels of William Gibson, the first ‘Matrix’ movie and this dizzying, ideas-heavy 1995 animated action flick. 

In a rain-flecked dystopian city, hybrid human-machine souls, or ‘ghosts’, patrol both the physical world and the knotted networks of cyberspace. When a rogue hacker known only as the Puppet Master manages to infiltrate government firewalls, it’s up to relentless, frequently nude female cyborg Kusanagi to track him down. 

There are moments of sheer visual poetry in ‘Ghost in the Shell’: its crumbling metropolis is vaster and more detailed than anything this side of ‘Blade Runner’, and the interface between the real world and cyberspace is beautifully realised. The plot is impossibly dense and the characters – perhaps appropriately – feel like little more than cyphers, but for sheer mind-expanding sci-fi strangeness this is hard to beat. - Tom Huddleston, TimeOut




Tuesday May 31, 2016

7:00pm

The Fifth Element

1997, France, 126 MINS, 14A

Dir: Luc Besson
Starring: Gary Oldman, Bruce Willis, Milla Jovovich, Chris Tucker, Ian Holm

Good and evil battle for the future of 23rd century Earth in this visually striking big-budget science fiction epic. In the movie's prologue, which is set in 1914, scientists gather in Egypt at the site of an event that transpired centuries earlier. Aliens, it seemed, arrived to collect four stones representing the four basic elements (earth, air, fire and water) - warning their human contacts that the objects were no longer safe on Earth. A few hundred years later (in the 23rd century), a huge ball of molten lava and flame is hurtling toward Earth, and scientist-holy man Victor Cornelius (Ian Holm) declares that in order to prevent it from destroying the planet, the same four elemental stones must be combined with the fifth element, as embodied by a visitor from another world named Leeloo (Milla Jovovich). However, if the force of evil presents itself to the stones instead, the Earth will be destroyed, and an evil being named Zorg (Gary Oldman) will trigger the disaster. Despite her remarkable powers, Leeloo needs help with her mission, and she chooses her accomplice, military leader-turned-cab driver Korben Dallas (Bruce Willis), when she literally falls through the roof of his taxi. Writer and director Luc Besson began writing the script for The Fifth Element when he was only 16 years old, though he was 38 before he was able to bring it to the screen. 
- Mark Deming, Rovi

9:30pm

Heavy Metal

1981, USA/Canada, 86 MINS, 14A

Dir: Gerald Potterton
Starring: Harold Ramis, John Candy, Joe Flaherty, Eugene Levy

In 1981, moviegoers were treated to something the world had never seen before or since: the spectacle that is Heavy Metal. The animated anthology film, directed by Oscar-nominated animator Gerald Potterton, was based loosely on the subversive, mind-bending comics magazine of the same name, and it became an instant cult class thanks to its vividly rendered segments, the voice talents of everyone from John Candy to Harold Ramis, and a counter-culture attitude that veers from riotously bawdy to majestically atmospheric. Oh, and it still has one of the best rock soundtracks of any movie, ever, period. - Jason Heller, Alamo Drafthouse

Wednesday June 1, 2016

7:00pm

Private Rental

2016, 120 MINS, G

9:30pm

Princess Bride

1987, USA, 98 MINS, PG

Dir: Rob Reiner
Starring: Cary Elwes, Andre The Giant, Robin Wright, Mandy Patinkin, Wallace Shawn

Based on William Goldman's novel of the same name, The Princess Bride is staged as a book read by grandfather (Peter Falk) to his ill grandson (Fred Savage). Falk's character assures a romance-weary Savage that the book has much more to deliver than a simpering love story, including but not limited to fencing, fighting, torture, death, true love, giants, and pirates. Indeed, The Princess Bride offers a tongue-in-cheek fairy tale depicting stable boy-turned-pirate Westley's journey to rescue Buttercup (Robin Wright), his true love, away from the evil prince (Chris Sarandon), whom she had agreed to marry five years after learning of what she had believed to be news of Westley's death. With help from Prince Humperdinck's disgruntled former employee Miracle Max (Billy Crystal), swordsman Inigo Montoya (Mandy Patinkin), and a very large man named Fezzik (Andre the Giant), the star-crossed lovers are reunited. ~ Tracie Cooper, Rovi




Thursday June 2, 2016

6:45pm

Alien: The Director’s Cut

1979, USA, 116 MINS, R

Dir: Ridley Scott
Starring: Tom Skeritt, Sigourney Weaver, Ian Holm, John Hurt, Yaphet Kotto, Harry Dean Stanton

The story follows seven crewmates aboard the commercial towing spaceship Nostromo, which is forced to touch down on a planetoid and investigate a distress signal. An alien larvae infiltrates their ship and Ellen Ripley (Weaver) and the crew spend half of the film alternately hunting and running from the interstellar parasite. When it came out in 1979, Alien made an impact on both science fiction and horror filmmaking, and has since become a classic in both genres.
Peter Hartlaub—San Francisco Chronicle



9:30pm

Aliens

1986, USA, 135 MINS, R

Dir: James Cameron
Starring: Sigourney Weaver, Carrie Henn, Michael Biehn

Fifty-seven years on, Ripley is discovered - Sleeping Beauty in space. Plagued by nightmares and surrounded by sceptics, she's forced to return to the resting place of the original alien's mother ship with a bunch of seen-it-all-before Marines. Confidently directed by James Cameron (heretofore known only for 'The Terminator' and 'Piranha II'), this sequel dares to build slowly, allowing Weaver to develop a multi-dimensional character even as it ups the ante by fetishising the Marines' hi-tech hardware and spawning legions of aliens (the suspense involves guessing which group will be cannon fodder). There is always an interesting tension in Cameron's work between masculine and feminine qualities. When it finally hits the fan here, we're in for the mother of all battles. - TimeOut

Thursday June 16, 2016

7:00pm

Wildlife Haven Waterloo presents: The Messenger

2016, 90 MINS, G

Dir: Su Rynard

A Night At The Theatre Fundraiser for Wildlife Haven Waterloo, a volunteer-run wildlife rehabilitation facility in Waterloo, Ontario.


 Please join us for a viewing of "The Messenger" Nominated for a 2016 Canadian Screen Award for Best Cinematography in a Feature Length Documentary. An international story with high stakes global consequences, mesmerizes audiences with stunning slow-motion sequences of songbirds in night flight – all the while chronicling the struggle of songbirds worldwide to survive the turbulent environmental conditions brought about by humans.
 
Advance tickets include entry into a raffle prize draw!

http://wildlifehavenwaterloo.ca/
 
Tickets at the door: $10.00

Doors open at 6:30pm, film starts at 7:00pm





 

 
 

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